Spending on advertising on mobile phones (smart and dumb ones) and tablets (iPads and soon Fires) is rocketing. It’s a great time to be exposed to related technology companies.

The analysts at eMarketer have estimated that ad spending in the U.S. on mobile devices will grow annually by 43% to ~$4.4 billion in 2015.  Let that sink in for moment –  that growth will occur in an economy that is only growing in the area of 4% (nominal terms).  The blur between what is “mobile” and what is “online” will intensify over that time.  You will be increasingly exposed to ads and offers that are more relevant, more timely and provided by more nearby vendors than can be imagined today. (see eMarketer linked here).   Jeb Terry, Sr. Oct. 6, 2011

Aberdeen Investment Management – a guide service for micro-cap technology investment

Android smartphone activations are about to reach 1 million PER DAY. The implication – more 24/7 access to information flow, more mobile commerce, more need for bandwidth . . . and . . . more demand for services from companies like the ones in the Aberdeen portfolio.

It is obvious to anyone reading this blog that one of Steve Jobs’ greatest legacies is the smartphone.  It is becoming a ubiquitous part of all of our lives.  This chart displays the growth in activation of smartphones using the Android operating system.  The inclusion of iPhones would put the daily activation rate well over 1 million.  The following chart comes courtesy of Silicon Alley Insider (linked here).   Jeb Terry, Sr. Oct. 6, 2011

Aberdeen Investment Management – a guide service for micro-cap technology investment

One reason unemployment is high is we have the most 21 year olds since the early 80’s – back when the unemployment rate was also persistently high.

There are many pieces to the employment puzzle.  An important piece is the number of people available to employ.  The unemployment rate will be biased upward if you have a rising number of inexperienced young workers.  The following chart shows the number of people reaching the age of 21 since 1948 as well as the unemployment rate measured as of June of each year.  The more young people there are- the higher the unemployment rate will be.  The good news is the number of 21 year olds peaks this year.  The decline in 21 year olds should have a positive influence on unemployment, all other things being equal.  I have generated the chart from birth rate data from the Census Bureau.   Jeb Terry, Sr. Oct. 6, 2011

Aberdeen Investment Management – a guide service for micro-cap technology investment